Welcome to Messiah!

Messiah is a community of Christians seeking to live face to face with God, with our brothers and sisters in Christ, and with the most vulnerable. Our faith and our life are rooted in the central Christian practices of every time and place: worship, prayer, celebrating holy baptism and holy communion, helping children grow in faith and knowledge, ministering to our community and the world, speaking for justice and wholeness in our lives and in the world, and inviting anyone to come and be a part of it all. 


We worship at three times every weekend: 

On Saturdays at 5 p.m. we celebrate Holy Communion in a casual, intimate atmosphere with piano and hymns. This service takes place in our Luther Center and lasts about 50 minutes.


On Sundays at 8 a.m. we celebrate Holy Communion with a diverse mix of music and instruments. This service takes place in our sanctuary and lasts about one hour.


On Sundays at 9:30 a.m. we celebrate Holy Communion with a diverse mix of music and instruments. From the second weekend in September until Memorial Day, Sunday School begins after the children's sermon. This service takes place in our sanctuary and lasts about one hour and ten minutes. 


Additionally, on the first Wednesday of every month at 10:30 a.m. we celebrate Holy Communion at Wauconda Care and Rehabilitation Center.


You are welcome here, because God welcomes you. 

What's Happening Right Now

All month long, Messiah is supporting ELCA World Hunger. Come to church to hear about everything we're helping to make happen!


On the nights of March 30-April 1 and April 7-8 Messiah is serving with PADS (Providing Advocacy, Dignity, and Shelter). Sign up here to help out for a couple hours.


Vacation Bible School will take place June 11-15 from 9:00am till Noon. Click here for our Registration Form.


Join our email list for more updates (2-3 times per month).


Click here for a full calendar of events.


Message from the Pastor:

Holy Week

Facebook has been in the news a lot lately, and not for good reasons. It turns out that site where we can see pictures of our high school classmate's kids and argue with our uncle's unhinged neighbor has been a funnel for our personal information and habits into the hands of people who are trying to manipulate us. 


However much or little that funneling mattered to the outcome of the last (or any) election, the stories have made me think again about how dependent we are on these platforms. It's how we consume news (though actual news articles are apparently being hidden by Facebook's algorithm), it's how we keep in touch with friends and family, it's how we communicate with each other. It's how we sharing the invitation to our Holy Week worship (RSVP here! Share with your friends!) And it's free! We all love conveniences, especially when they're free.


We've learned an old truth about free platforms from these stories: if you're not paying for the content, you're not the consumer--you're the product. Our precious, scarce attention, our emotional reactions, even our loyalties are the thing being packaged and sold. That's true of social media, it's true of old-fashioned broadcast television, it's true of almost every app on our phones and tablets. 


I've come to love, and be very passionate about, the places and things that don't extract anything from us when we wish to encounter them. We happen to have a wonderful local library in Wauconda, but public libraries in general are almost miraculous today--you can just show up and read or use the computer or borrow a telescope! You can buy a cup of coffee but you don't have to.


And that's something very powerful and liberating about church, too. Yes, there are always a bunch of ways to give your money at church. But no one is turned away from worship because they have no money to give and no data to hand over. We come to the holy Word and the holy Sacrament of God freely and not as targets for manipulation or exploitation. Worship is the work we do together as Christians, but it is freely offered work. No one can force you to come, and no one is extracting or selling your data when you do. 


So this Holy Week and Easter, I invite you to experience the freedom of worship. This is our chance to participate again in the death and resurrection of our Lord--not as a product, not as a target, but as his freely chosen people responding freely in love.


Rev. Ben Dueholm, Pastor of Worship and Education